The Stinging Nettle, Using it to Our Advantage.

Uritica dioica ,commonly known as Stinging nettle is a plant with many therapeutic applications due to its benefits and medicinal properties, it is also used in some traditional recipes due to its content in vitamins and minerals. In order to take advantage of its medicinal and nutritional benefits, we can use the nettle both internally (preparing it in infusion, tincture, infused oil, purees, soups, stews, etc.) and externally (plasters and oils) Both fresh and dry. For medicinal purposes mainly the leaves are used but sometimes also the roots of the nettle are used.

Nettle leaves are very rich in minerals, providing good amounts of iron, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, copper, boron, zinc, silica and vitamins A, B2, B5, B9, C and K. Provides chlorophyll, mucilages, flavonoids and fiber. The root of the nettle contains tannins and is well known for having astringent effects.The root can be taken dry in tea or powder form.

Fun fact, comparing spinach with nettles: Ten grams of nettle contains 290 milligrams of calcium and 86 milligrams of magnesium. In comparison, 10 grams of raw spinach contains 10 milligrams of calcium and 8 milligrams of magnesium!

When taking it orally, via tea or other, its effects benefit mainly the kidneys improving its functions and increases urine output and removal of uric acid. Nettle tea is effective in reducing itching and sneezing provoked by rashes, eczema or hay fever, also promoting hair and nail growth and eliminates acne. Studies have also shown that this plant helps with diabetes, blood pressure and arthritis.

If you have a garden or live near nature it is easy to spot this plant remember to handle it with gloves or pick it up from the under part of the leaf (only the top surface stings). Start to incorporate Nettles it into your diet and feel re-energised!

By Delfina Heskett.

@ http://www.diypirates.com